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National Institutes of Health (NIH) Disclosure FAQs

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The information below provides Stanford’s guidance for frequently asked questions regarding the NIH Other Support. Please also refer to the NIH Published FAQ’s  on this topic. 

This content is being updated and expanded as we receive additional questions and guidance from NIH.  Please bookmark this page and visit frequently to view the most up-to-date content. Last Updated October 19, 2021.

General FAQ’s

1. In the past, NIH had separate versions of the Other Support format page for competing applications (Just-In-Time) compared to the version submitted for the RPPR. Will there still be two different versions moving forward? (NEW – August 30, 2021)

  • Per NIH’s FAQ’s, there are no longer separate instructions for RPPR’s and competing applications, so the same information is being requested for both competing applications (Just-in-Time) and the RPPR. For progress reports, NIH still requires recipients to report/submit Other Support when there are significant changes in existing Senior/Key Personnel Other Support and for any new senior/key personnel being requested in the RPPR.

2. I discovered that I had accidentally omitted an item in my NIH Other Support that I submitted. What should I do? (NEW – August 30, 2021)

  • For Other Support, notify and contact your Institutional Official as soon as possible to discuss the need to submit updated information to NIH. Omissions must be reported to the NIH within 30 days after it becomes known.

3. Do endowments need to be reported in the Other Support? (NEW – August 30, 2021)

  • Endowed chair funds, professorships and other endowment allocations do not need to be reported in the Other Support. 

Note: Endowment funds at Stanford are in Oracle awards that begin K-N (Reference:Stanford Award Ranges)

4. Are patent income/royalties disclosable as Other Support? (NEW – August 30, 2021)

  • No, because these are not specifically awarded or provided for the purpose of research.

5. Are start-up funds disclosable? (NEW – August 30, 2021)

  • No, start-up provided to the Investigator by Stanford University are not disclosable.
  • However, start-up packages that are provided by an outside organization, including foreign entities, are disclosable. This includes start-up funds provided as part of an Investigator’s appointment at a different Institution, if applicable.

Proposals and Projects

1. Should an investigator list only the pending proposals that they think are likely to be funded, or all proposals that have been submitted to date, but have not yet been rejected or awarded?

  • The list of pending proposals should include a complete list of proposals submitted to date--all which have not yet been formally rejected or awarded.

2. Should an investigator list proposals and/or awards on which they were listed as PI, Co-PI, or other key personnel that were not processed by Stanford or the VA and do NOT include a subcontract to Stanford?

  • Yes; though these may be rare, if the sponsored project involves the conduct of research that benefits the investigator’s research endeavors, this should be reported in the Other Support.

3. What amount should be listed for the Total Award Amount section? (UPDATED – August 30, 2021)

  • The total award costs for the entire period of performance (including indirect costs) should be entered here. Note that this is for the current competitive segment*. This includes the expected amount for the outyears based on the notice of award/agreement. For pending, enter the proposed total costs for the entire period of performance.
  • For Subawards or Multi-Project Awards (e.g. Multi-Component), indicate the total award amount for the subproject only. If the award is not a subaward or a multi-component, enter the full total award amount for the entire award.
  • If the Investigator wants to provide information with respect to what their lab’s specific portion of the funding is, such as for non-multi-project awards, we recommend including this information in addition to (not in place of) the total full award amount, and adding parenthesis:

4. Should an investigator list current, pending, and completed University Research proposals and/or awards on which they were listed as PI, Co-PI, or other key personnel?

  • Yes. Regardless of effort or salary provided by the University Research Award (URA) to the Investigator. If the internal Stanford award supports and benefits the investigator’s research endeavors, it should be disclosed as Other Support. If the URA does not require measurable effort for the Investigator and none was proposed, list “As Needed” effort and add a note that this is an Internal Stanford Award.

5. Should an investigator list current, pending, and completed Seed Grants and Pilot Awards in their NIH Other Support?

  • Yes. If the seed grant and/or pilot award supports and benefits the investigator’s research endeavors, it should be disclosed as Other Support. If the grant and pilot award does not require measurable effort for the Investigator and none was proposed, list “As Needed” effort and add a note if this is a seed grant or pilot award.

In-Kind Contributions

General

1. Do Core Facilities and shared equipment need to be included in Other Support? What about those that are provided in-kind by external sources? Where should I list these?

  • Facilities, equipment, and other resources that are institutional resources that are broadly available to investigators at Stanford do not need to be listed as Other Support; instead, if they are used for the proposed project, they can be listed in the Facilities and Other Resources document and/or Equipment document.
  • However, if there are facilities, equipment, and other resources or contributions that are provided from an external source and are uniquely available to the researcher and not to the entire Stanford community, these must be reported be reported as Other Support. See additional FAQs below for more on in-kind materials and contributions.
  • Additionally, if the resource is benefitting the project being proposed, it should be listed in the Facilities and Other Resources and/or Equipment documents of the proposal submission.
  • While it technically does not need to be repeated in the Other Support submitted for this specific proposal, it needs to be reported for Other Support submitted for other proposals and projects.
  • Since NIH’s instructions do not prohibit repeated information between documents, it may be advisable to always list in-kind contributions in the Other Support document to avoid accidentally omitting between NIH Other Support submitted for different projects.

2. Should an investigator list their research collaborations whereby time, effort, or services are provided in-kind by an external collaborator (funded by external collaborators’ funds) as in-kind support in their NIH Other Support?

  • Yes. Other Support includes research collaborations that are provided in-kind that directly benefit the investigator’s research endeavors. If the collaborations also includes in-kind materials in addition to the time, effort, or services, then it should be incorporated in the in-kind contribution entry for the collaboration.

3. How far back do I go for reporting Active In-Kind Contributions? (NEW – August 30, 2021)

  • Materials and resources provided to the Investigator within the past 3 years, that are actively being used, must be included in Other Support.
  • If it is a continuous resource or contribution (i.e. services) or a renewing resource (i.e. data that is updated or added to continuously), then it should remain disclosed.

Personnel

1. Should an investigator list students and postdocs who receive their own fellowships, training grant appointees, or career development awards as in-kind support in their Other Support? (UPDATED – October 19, 2021)

  • If the Stanford student or postdoctoral fellow is directly awarded or supported by their own fellowship or career development awards from an external source (or is a training grant trainee) and they are performing research activities in support of the Investigator’s research endeavors, their support must be reported as an in-kind resource.  If the relationship is solely a mentor/mentee arrangement without research activities, then it does not need to be reported.
  • In addition:
    • If the Stanford student or postdoc are supported by an internal fellowship (such as a Dean’s Fellowship), then this is not In-Kind support disclosable in the benefitting Investigator’s NIH Other Support.
    • Note: Please check with student services or the relevant department post doc administrator if unsure about a funding source. There may be some awards that appear to be internal, but are actually external: For example, the following are disclosable if they also meet the criteria in the above first main bullet point:
      • Some MSTP students can be funded by/appointed to an externally funded NIH T32
      • Appointees to Institutional Training or Career Development grants such as T32’s and K12’s are disclosable.
      • NSF GFRP fellows since the main GFRP is an Institutional Award to Stanford.
      • If they are partially supported by both external and internal fellowships, only the external portion is disclosable as In-Kind support in the benefitting Investigator’s Other Support.

2. Should an Investigator list registered students and postdocs who receive Outside Funding as in-kind resources in their NIH Other Support?

  • If the student or postdoctoral fellow directly receives Outside Funding not managed by Stanford and they are performing research activities in support of the Investigator’s research endeavors, their support must be reported as an in-kind resource. If the relationship is solely a mentor/mentee arrangement without research activities, then it does not need to be reported.

3. Should an investigator list an externally funded Visiting Student Researcher (“VSR”) that contributes to the investigator's research endeavors as in-kind resources on their NIH Other Support?

  • If the visiting student or visiting postdoc is performing research activities in support of the Investigator’s research endeavors, their support must be reported as an in-kind resource.

4. Should an investigator list their Visiting Scholar who is a faculty from another institution of higher education (or Outside Entity) as in-kind support in their NIH Other Support document?

  • If the Visiting Scholar is performing research activities in support of the Investigator’s research endeavors, their support must be reported as an in-kind resource.

5. Should an Investigator list a Visiting Scholar from an outside company that is in the Investigator’s research lab as part of an Industrial Affiliates Program annual membership/donation? (NEW – August 30, 2021)

  • Yes, if the Visiting Scholar, as part of the Industrial Affiliates Program, is performing research activities in support of the Investigator’s research endeavors, their support must be reported as an in-kind resource to the Investigator.

Non-Personnel

1. Should an investigator list externally-provided at no cost, high-value materials that are not freely available (e.g., biologics, chemical, model systems, technology, data sets etc.) to which they have access for their research as in-kind support in their NIH Other Support?

  • Yes. If the high-value materials are (1) provided by an external entity, (2) not freely available, (3) uniquely available to the researcher, and (4) currently used in their research endeavors, these should be listed as an in-kind resource in their NIH Other Support.
  • When listing, include the source, summary of in-kind contribution, and the estimated value. If the dollar value is not readily ascertainable, reasonable estimates should be provided.

2. What are examples of “high-value materials” that an investigator should disclose as in-kind resources/contributions in their NIH Other Support document?

  • NIH requires that investigators disclose in-kind resources that are currently used in their research endeavors. This includes the “provision of high-value materials that are not freely available (e.g., biologics, chemical, model systems, technology, etc.).” 
  • Examples to consider include but are not limited to: molecules, biologics, chemicals, vectors, data, libraries, model systems such as transgenic mice, cell lines, or other resources, etc. provided by companies, outside entities, and external collaborators/colleagues for use in your research, provided under agreements.
  • Also consider additional in-kind support provided by companies, outside entities, and external collaborators/colleagues: such as data sets, cloud storage space, equipment loans, and transfers of goods and services that occur under unfunded collaboration or other agreements. 
  • Do not report items that you purchased from companies, as they are not “in-kind” support.

3. Should an investigator list access to, without compensation, office/laboratory space, resources, and/or equipment at an external entity (foreign and/or domestic), such as a company or another institution of higher education, while the investigator is as in-kind support in their NIH Other Support?

  • If the investigator’s access to the facilities, equipment, and resources will be used to benefit or in support of their research endeavors this must be reported as an in-kind resource.
  • This is remains true even when the investigator is on sabbatical and performs research outside of Stanford and has access to facilities, equipment, and resources in support of their research endeavors. These must be reported as an in-kind resource as part of their NIH Other Support.

4. Should an investigator list access to Company X’s office/laboratory space, resources, and/or equipment while the investigator consults at Company X as in-kind support in their NIH Other Support?

  • Outside consulting or professional service arrangements that do not involve research do not need to be reported. However, if the investigator will be conducting research as part of consulting activities, it needs to be reported as Other Support.
  • If the investigator’s access to the Company’s facilities, equipment, and resources will be benefiting their research endeavors this must be reported as an in-kind resource.

Need further assistance? Have questions and/or feedback? Please submit questions and/or feedback and a member of the ORA-RMG Disclosures Team will respond to you shortly.